Google Builds Password Checkup Tool Into Chrome

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The Google Chrome Password Checkup tool helps protect accounts from third-party data breaches (via Google)

Between climate change, government corruption, gender inequality, and Brexit, who has the time or energy to think up unique digital passwords?

Google, that’s who.

In an effort to boost online security, the tech titan is expanding its Password Checkup tool, which helps protect user accounts from third-party data breaches.

Introduced in February as a Chrome extension and now accessible via the web, the feature keeps Google Accounts safe by proactively detecting and responding to security threats.

Any time you username and password are detected among compromised credentials, Google triggers an automatic warning and suggests a change.

With just one click, Password Checkup informs users when codes are being reused across multiple sites (which, let’s face it, you already know) and nudges folks to strengthen their keywords.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=immgP7cniXM?feature=oembed?wmode=transparent

“This is just one way we help protect you across the internet, not just on Google,” product manager Andreas Tuerk wrote in a blog post.

These features, he continued, “are all examples of how we’re continuously working to make your online experience safer and easier. So the next time you’re struggling to remember how many !s and 1s you added to your last password, we can help.”

The cautionary tool is most useful when you heed its advice and update your credentials ASAP. Dilly dally too long, and an attacker can still weasel their way into your account.

The function has been installed more than 1 million times since February.

Moving forward, Google will integrate Password Checkup directly into Chrome by default—”so you get real-time protection as you type your password without needing to install a separate extension,” Tuerk said.

The company this week also announced private Incognito browsing mode for Maps, as well as the ability to auto-delete YouTube browsing history and Google Assistant voice activity.

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