Good To SEO | Search engine optimization (SEO) Blog News


Top%2BFive%2BTools%2Bfor%2BSocial%2BStudies%2BTeachers%2B%2526%2BStudents

Earlier this week I published my top five Google tools for social studies teachers and students. Recognizing that not everyone wants to use or has access to G Suite for Education accounts, here are my top five non-Google tools for social studies teachers and students. I didn’t include my all-time favorite timeline tool, Timeline JS because I wanted to keep this completely free of a need for a Google account.

DocsTeach
DocsTeach is a free service provided by the U.S. National Archives. Through DocsTeach you can create online activities based upon primary source artifacts from the National Archives. Your students can complete the activities online. Don’t let the fact that the service is provided by the National Archives fool you into thinking that it can only be used for U.S. History lessons. You can upload any primary source artifact that you like to your DocsTeach account to develop an online history activity. DocsTeach offers more than a dozen activity templates that you can follow to develop your primary source-based lessons.

EDpuzzle
When I taught social studies I liked to use video clips as part of current events lessons. I also liked to use excerpts from documentary videos. If you use videos in the same way, EDpuzzle is a tool that you need to try. EDpuzzle lets you add questions directly into the timeline of the video.



Synth
Conversations about historical events and current events is an important aspect of teaching social studies. Sometimes the constraints of the classroom setting (time, attendance, student dynamics) limit the amount of constructive conversation that takes place. Synth is a free platform that you can use to have students record short podcasts and then reply to each other’s podcasts with audio comments of their own. Watch this video to see how it works.

READ ALSO  Bizarre Wearable Face Projector Can be Used to Fool Facial Recognition Systems – TechEBlog



WeVideo
If you want your students to make short documentary-style videos, WeVideo is hard to beat. It works on Chromebooks, Windows, Android, iOS, and Mac (though if you have a Mac, iMovie is just as good). Those who have upgraded WeVideo accounts can even use it to make green screen videos.

RWT Timeline & Sutori
Elementary school teachers who are looking for an easy way for students to create timelines that include pictures should take a look at Read Write Think’s Timeline Creator. Students can use it without creating any kind of online account and it’s simple to use. Watch this video to see how it works.

Middle school and high school teachers who are looking for ways for their students to create multimedia timelines would do well to try Sutori. Sutori offers a collaborative multimedia timeline tool for students. Students can work together to add pictures, text, and video to timelines that they build in Sutori. Teachers who use Clever or Google Classroom can use those rosters to add students to Sutori.



Source link

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Linkedin
  • Pinterest
  • Buffer
  • stumbleupon
  • Reddit

Join To Our Newsletter

You are welcome

This div height required for enabling the sticky sidebar
WP Twitter Auto Publish Powered By : XYZScripts.com
Ad Clicks :Ad Views : Ad Clicks :Ad Views : Ad Clicks :Ad Views : Ad Clicks :Ad Views : Ad Clicks :Ad Views : Ad Clicks :Ad Views : Ad Clicks :Ad Views : Ad Clicks :Ad Views : Ad Clicks :Ad Views : Ad Clicks :Ad Views : Ad Clicks :Ad Views : Ad Clicks :Ad Views : Ad Clicks :Ad Views : Ad Clicks :Ad Views : Ad Clicks :Ad Views : Ad Clicks :Ad Views : Ad Clicks :Ad Views : Ad Clicks :Ad Views :